Post-pregnancy 'mommy makeover' surgery - Los Angeles Local News | FOX 11 LA KTTV

Post-pregnancy 'mommy makeover' surgery

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

After gaining 65 pounds while pregnant with her second child, 35-year old Alana Ezderman was determined to lose her baby weight.

Working out and even becoming a certified spinning instructor helped her shed the pregnancy pounds, but not the extra skin around her belly.

"Not only was I far away from who I was physically, but emotionally and mentally I was light years away," Alana says. "I didn't even want to look at myself in the mirror."

Alana turned to Dr. Adam Kolker, a Manhattan plastic surgeon. He says many women find that after pregnancy no amount of exercise can get rid of that annoying and unflattering pooch.

"Those muscles with pregnancy will stretch, so the inner margins of those muscles which are usually together will separate and one of the things that will happen with that is the tummy will bulge," Dr. Kolker says.

That's not all. Women's breasts will often lose elasticity and volume, making them sag and change shape, he says. That's why a growing number of moms like Alana are opting for "mommy makeovers."

During one day of surgery, they receive a tummy tuck along with breast implants, a breast lift, or both.

The trend is growing too. The American Society of Plastic Surgery reports that breast lifts alone have jumped 96 percent in the past six years.

Dr. Kolker decided that because Alana was healthy, she was a good candidate for all three procedures. Her recovery took about a week, but she says the benefits will last a lifetime.

"I am invigorated. I have an energy I haven't had since before I had my kids," she says.

The cost of a mommy makeover varies greatly, but usually runs around $10,000 to $15,000.

It's often cheaper to get more than one procedure done in the same day because a patient only has to undergo anesthesia once.

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