Parents want medical marijuana for young child - Los Angeles Local News | FOX 11 LA KTTV

Parents want medical marijuana for young child

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NEW JERSEY (MYFOXNY.COM) -

A New Jersey family is fighting for changes to the state's medical marijuana laws to make it easier for children to have access to the drug.

Vivian Wilson's parents are hoping an edible form of medical marijuana-- not sold at dispensaries in the state-- becomes available for their child.

They say that if a bill before NJ Gov. Chris Christie is signed into law, it could go a long way to helping their two-year-old girl with a severe form of epilepsy called Dravet Syndrome.

She started having seizures at two months old.  They say she still seizes, on average, 15 times a day.

"The dispensaries can only sell three strains and the strain that Vivian needs isn't as popular. They're growing strains that people want to buy, but they're just now becoming more popular," said Meghan Wilson, Vivian's mother.

Vivian Wilson, of Scotch Plains, is among a number of patients with legal authorization to receive medical marijuana.  But, her parents say, she has yet to receive any medication due to the state's restrictive medical marijuana program.

"We learned from other families in compassionate states that they were using medical marijuana-- certain strains-- and their children were doing really well, (reductions in seizures)," said Meghan Wilson.

The girl's parents are asking the public to write letters urging Gov. Christie to sign the bill which would only require one doctor's authorization for dispensing medical marijuana to a child.

Currently three doctors are required to sign off on a child's prescription.

"Even if it passes we have to encourage them to not have too many restrictions," said Brian Wilson, Vivian's father.

For more information on Vivian and Dravet syndrome, visit Letters4Vivian.com

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