Scammers seek personal information from NY seniors - Los Angeles News | FOX 11 LA KTTV

Scammers seek personal information from NY seniors

Posted: Updated:

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) -- New York state officials are warning seniors about scammers promising "free" medical alert devices.
 
The Department of State's Division of Consumer Protection has received dozens of consumer complaints about callers posing as representatives for medical device companies. The callers ask senior citizens for money and personal information in return for supposedly free medical alert equipment.
 
State officials note that legitimate medical alert companies do not ask for personal information in unsolicited phone calls. They suggest hanging up the phone If you receive an unsolicited call from a stranger asking for personal information.

  • HealthMore>>

  • FDA Approves Blood Test to Aid Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes

    FDA Approves Blood Test to Aid Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes

    FDA Approves Blood Test to Aid Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes blood test detects unique autoantibody (dailyRx News) While Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes share some traits, treatments for each condition...
    FDA Approves Blood Test to Aid Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes blood test detects unique autoantibody (dailyRx News) While Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes share some traits, treatments for each...
  • Reversing Prediabetes May Be a Heart Saver

    Reversing Prediabetes May Be a Heart Saver

    Reversing Prediabetes May Be a Heart Saver Diabetes and heart disease risk drops in prediabetes patients who regain normal blood sugar (dailyRx News) Blood sugar levels that are high but not high...
    Reversing Prediabetes May Be a Heart Saver Diabetes and heart disease risk drops in prediabetes patients who regain normal blood sugar (dailyRx News) Blood sugar levels that are high but not high enough to...
  • Study: Fewer painkiller deaths in states with medical marijuana

    Study: Fewer painkiller deaths in states with medical marijuana

    Wednesday, August 27 2014 9:59 PM EDT2014-08-28 01:59:55 GMT
    A study is published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that in the 13 states that passed laws between 1999 and 2010 allowing medical marijuana, the number of people who died from overdosing on prescription painkillers fell by 25 percent. The study suggests that patients are smoking marijuana to treat pain instead of taking prescription pain killers. But Dr. Robert Glatter of Lenox Hill Hospital said the study is flawed.
    A study is published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that in the 13 states that passed laws between 1999 and 2010 allowing medical marijuana, the number of people who died from overdosing on prescription painkillers fell by 25 percent. The study suggests that patients are smoking marijuana to treat pain instead of taking prescription pain killers. But Dr. Robert Glatter of Lenox Hill Hospital said the study is flawed.
Powered by WorldNow

KTTV FOX 11
1999 S. Bundy Dr.
Los Angeles CA 90025

Main: (310) 584-2000
News Tips? (310) 584-2025

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices