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Apps that know what you want

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In the Terminator trilogy, entrusting our nation's defense to a machine led to the rise of cyborg assassin and, very nearly, the demise of mankind. In real life, handing over our cellphones -- and everything on them -- to a series of newish apps will either terminate the need for us to remember anything on our own or what little privacy we have left, depending on whom you ask.

"It's too personal," one man said. "I got too much personal stuff on my phone. I don't want nobody in my business."

"I'd be into it," another woman said. "I don't mind. The more technology the better."

"It's just a question of what you're willing to let the machine do," tech expert and author Shelly Palmer said. "And a lot of people have moral, ethical, psychological issues with that."

Predictive search services -- such as Google Now, ReQall, Evernote and others -- sift through everything your phone access: e-mails, calendars, alarms, social media, etc. Those apps then use that information to provide tips and reminders without one's prompting.

If that idea makes you a little nervous just to be around your phone, imagine this scenario: Your device wakes you up before you told it to and tells you a faster way to get to a destination you've never plugged in before so you're on time for an event you thought your phone didn't know about.

"Depending on how old you are, you're either going to think this is super cool or super creepy," Palmer said.

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